Law to Justice Article 47 Technics of cross-examination in accordance with the rule & practice of Bangladesh

47 Technics of cross-examination in accordance with the rule & practice of Bangladesh

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Cross-examination is a key part of a trial, as it allows the lawyer questioning the witness to test their credibility and explore any inconsistencies in their testimony. Here are a few tips for conducting a successful cross-examination:


Know your witness: Before the trial, review the witness’s testimony and any other relevant materials to be well-prepared for your cross-examination.


Stay focused: During the cross-examination, stay focused on your main points, and don’t get sidetracked.


Ask open-ended questions: Avoid yes/no questions and instead ask open-ended questions that encourage the witness to elaborate on their testimony.


Use leading questions sparingly: Leading questions, which suggest the desired answer, can be useful for clarifying a witness’s testimony, but be careful not to overuse them or the judge may sustain an objection.


Be respectful: It’s important to be respectful and professional during the cross-examination, even if the witness is being evasive or uncooperative.


Use exhibits: If you have physical evidence or documents that support your case, use them during the cross-examination to help illustrate your points.


Watch the witness’s body language: Pay attention to the witness’s body language and look for discrepancies between their words and their actions.


End on a strong note: Summarize your main points and reinforce your case with a strong closing statement during the cross-examination.


Keep it simple: Use clear, simple language and avoid using legal jargon or complicated concepts that the witness may not understand.


Don’t argue with the witness: Avoid arguing or debating with the witness, as this can be seen as confrontational and may not be effective in persuading the jury.


Don’t badger the witness: Avoid repeating the same question or continuing to press the witness if they are unable to answer. This can be seen as harassing the witness and may not be effective in persuading the jury.


Use silence effectively: Sometimes, a long pause or silence after a question can be effective in causing the witness to fill the silence with more information.


Be prepared for objections: During the cross-examination, the lawyer for the other side may object to your questions. Be prepared to respond to objections and have backup questions ready in case the judge sustains an objection.


Use nonverbal cues: In addition to paying attention to the witness’s body language, be aware of your own nonverbal cues and try to appear confident and composed during the cross-examination.


Take breaks: If the cross-examination is lengthy, consider taking breaks to regroup and refocus. This can help you maintain your energy and stay focused throughout the process.


Don’t overdo it: While it’s important to test the witness’s credibility and explore any inconsistencies in their testimony, avoid going on for too long or asking too many questions. This can be seen as harassing the witness and may not be effective in persuading the jury.


Don’t get personal: Avoid attacking the witness’s character or bringing up personal matters that are not relevant to the case.


Don’t try to trick the witness: Avoid trying to trick the witness or catch them off guard with unexpected questions. This can backfire and undermine your credibility with the jury.


Be prepared for surprises: The witness may say something unexpected or bring up new information during the cross-examination. Be prepared to adjust your strategy and be flexible.


Practice, practice, practice: Like any other skill, cross-examination takes practice to master. Consider role-playing with a colleague or finding opportunities to observe other lawyers conducting cross-examinations to improve your skills.


Use visual aids: If you have visual aids such as charts, diagrams, or photos that can help illustrate your points, consider using them during the cross-examination.


Use the witness’s own words: If the witness has made statements in the past that contradict their current testimony, consider using those statements to challenge their credibility.


Don’t get flustered: If the witness is uncooperative or evasive, remain calm and composed. Losing your cool or getting flustered can undermine your credibility with the jury.


Use rhetorical questions sparingly: Rhetorical questions can be a useful tool for making a point, but be careful not to overuse them or they may come across as confrontational or aggressive.


Don’t rely on memory: If you are using notes or other materials to help guide your cross-examination, don’t rely on your memory alone. It’s important to have a written record of what you want to ask the witness.


Focus on the witness’s credibility: The main goal of cross-examination is to test the witness’s credibility, so be sure to focus on their testimony and any inconsistencies or discrepancies.


Be aware of the judge’s reactions: Pay attention to the judge’s reactions during the cross-examination, as they may provide clues about what is and is not effective.


Don’t try to argue your case: Cross-examination is not the time to argue your case or present new evidence. Its purpose is to test the credibility of the witness.


Don’t ask for speculation: Avoid asking the witness to speculate or give their opinion on matters outside their knowledge or expertise.


Stay within the scope of the direct examination: During the cross-examination, you should stay within the scope of the direct examination and not ask the witness about topics that were not covered during their initial testimony.


Be strategic: Choose your questions carefully and have a clear strategy in mind for how you want to test the witness’s credibility.


Don’t be afraid to ask for clarification: If the witness is unclear or evasive, don’t be afraid to ask for clarification or further elaboration.


Use previous statements to your advantage: If the witness has made statements in the past that contradict their current testimony, use those statements to challenge their credibility.


Don’t be afraid to ask tough questions: While it’s important to be respectful, don’t be afraid to ask tough questions if they are necessary to test the witness’s credibility.


Use props to your advantage: If you have physical evidence or props that can help illustrate your points, consider using them during the cross-examination.


Avoid using leading questions too frequently: Leading questions, which suggest the desired answer, can be useful for clarifying a witness’s testimony, but be careful not to overuse them or the judge may sustain an objection.


Take notes: It can be helpful to take notes during the cross-examination to help you keep track of the witness’s responses and identify any inconsistencies in their testimony.


Don’t be afraid to ask for a clarification of the question: If you are unsure what the witness is asking, don’t be afraid to ask for clarification.


Nayem Hasan Ovi
Criminal Lawyer in Bangladesh
nayemh2111@hotmail.com
+8809638-748193

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